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The Holy Bible










There are 66 books in the bible. 39 are in the Old Testament and 27 are in the New Testament.
Here are the 39 books of the OLD testament. Click on any title in the grid and it will take you down the page. Use your back key to come back to the top here.




Genesis
Exodus
Leviticus
Numbers
Deuteronomy
Joshua
Judges
Ruth
1 Samuel
2 Samuel
1 Kings
2 Kings
1 Chronicles
2 Chronicles
Ezra
Nehemiah
Esther
Job
Psalms
Proverbs
Ecclesiastes
Song of Songs
Isiah
Jeremiah
Lamentations
Ezekiel
Daniel
Hosea
Joel
Amos
Obadiah
Jonah
Micah
Nahum
Habakkuk
Zephaniah
Haggai
Zechariah
Malachi









GENESIS
The book of Genesis is about beginnings-the beginning of the universe, the beginning of the human race, the beginning of sin, and the beginning of God's promises and plan for salvation. Genesis is mainly a story of relationships - between God and his people, between God and nature and between his people and others . Genesis reminds us of the beautiful ways in which God initiates and enters into covenants with all of his chosen people and how he pledges his love and faithfulness to us.



EXODUS
In Exodus the author Moses unfolds a revelation of God's name, his attributes, his redemption, his law and his worship. Moses tells exciting stories of how God delivers his people from salvery in Egypt, how he gives them the law at Mount Sinia and how he instructs them to build the tabernacle. The book of Exodus demostrates not only the depth of God's saving love for his people but also the fact that his holiness demands obidience. The Ten Commandments embody God's concern for our welfare and holiness even today.



LEVITICUS
Moses writes Leviticus while the Israelites are in the desert, before they enter the promised land. The books key thought is stated in 11:45 --
" be holy, because I am holy." The laws in the book were given to help the Israelites worship and live as God's holy people. Even though the new covenant has freed us from the intricacies of the Levitical law, Leviticus reminds us that every part of our lives is important to God and that we are to love and to serve him in holiness.


NUMBERS
The book of Numbers gets its name from the two numberings, or countings of the people of Israel during their years of wandering in the desert. Numbers represent an accounting of the wandering following the establishment of the covenant at Mt. Sinia. It tells of the murmuring and rebellion of God's people and of their subsequent judgement. Throughout the years in the desert one thing becomes clear to Israel __ God's constant care for them. Not only does he meet their needs but he also loves and continually forgives his people.



DEUTERONOMY
After fourty years the Israelites are about to enter Canaan. Before they do, Moses reminds them of all that God has done for them and encourages them to keep obeying the laws God has given them. Moses reminds them of God's goodness to them throughout their journey and through his giving them the land of Canaan. Above all, Moses wants his people to see how much God loves them and how they are to return that love to their powerful God.



JOSHUA
Named after its leading character, Joshua, whom God appointed leader of Israel before Moses' death, this book begins with the tribes still camped on the east side of the Jordan River. Joshua tells the story of how, with God's help. the people cross the Jordan River and take possession of the promised land. Joshua reminds the people of God's covenant promises to them and urges them to serve only the Lord.





Judges
The book of Judges gives an account of Israel's frequent failure and apostasy, which in turn provoke God's discipline. It also tells of the peoples urgent appeals to God in times of cisis, which move him to raise up leaders (judges) through whom he thows off oppression and resores the land to peace. Judges reminds us to let go of our rebellion and find joy in God's firm but loving and forgivivg presence.



Ruth
This book tells the story of Ruth, a young Moabite woman and great-grandmother of King David. Set in the time of the judges, the book of Ruth gives a series of intimate glimpes into the private lives of the members of an Israelite family and presents a delightful account of true faith and piety. In this powerful story of love and devotion, look for God at work to bring fullness in the lives of those who feel empty.



1 Samuel
The book of 1 Samuel records the lives of Samuel and Saul and much of the life of David. Here you will find the story of Israel"s first king, Saul. But Saul disobeys God, who in turn rejects him as king. The prophet Samuel secretely anoints David to take Saul's place. The rest of the book records the struggles between Saul and David. As you read this book, note how God protects and blesses those who follow him obediently and how those who disregard him inevitably face difficulties.



2 Samuel
This book tells of the story of David's reign over Israel. Although God called David a man after his own heart (ACTS 13:22), David knew sin and failure. The book of 2 Samuel tells the story of David's adultery and testifies to the power of God's faithfulness and forgiving love. Look for God's hand at work as the nation prospers under David's rule. Take comfort that as you lay your sins before God, he will forgive you and use you once again in his service.





1 Kings
The books of 1 and 2 Kings were originally on literary work, called "KINGS". Beginning with Solomon's reign, 1 Kings records the history of Israel through the divided kingdom to the death of King Ahab. In general, 1 and 2 Kings describe the history of the kings of Israel and Judah in light of God's covenants. As you read the accounts, note the positive examples to follow and the mistakes to avoid as you seek to serve God in your life.



2 Kings
The book of 2 Kings continues the history of Israel and Judah begun in 1 Kings. It includes the fascinating stories of the great prophets Elijah and Elisha. Look for the prophet's warning that God will punish the people if they do not repent of their sins, and note the terrible losses God's people endure because of their sin.



1 Chronicles
The book of Chronicles is written for the exiles who have returned to Israel after the Babylonian captivity.It reminds them that they are still God's chosen people. The burning issue is the question of continunity with the past:
Is God still intrested in them? Are his covenants still in force? Do they still fit into his plan? Be Encouraged by God's affirmation that his people belong to him, and then respond to him with worship and thanksgiving.


2 Chronicles
The book of 2 Chronicles continues the history of David's royal line. This book, like 1 Chronicles, teaches that the people's relationship to God is crucial to their daily living. Notice that when the author writes about the kings, he measures them on the basis of their faithfulness to God. The reigns of evil kings are reported by the author briefly, while the reigns of good kings are described in more detail.





Ezra
Ezra tells of the return of the Jews from exile in Babylon and also of the rebuilding of the temple. The people complete and dedicate the temple in 516 B.C. after being delayed for 18 years by their enemies from the north. As you read this book, take comfort in the story of ordinary people, restored by God, and rejoice in the God who always gives you a second chance to trust and follow him.



Nehemiah
The book of Nehemiah continues the history of the Jews who return from exile in Babylon. Nehemiah goes to Jerusaleem in 445 B.C. and leads the people in repairing the walls. Along with Ezra he provides leadership for the people. A recurring theme of this book is the importance of prayer. As you read this book, learn from Nehemiah's example of balancing spirituality with down-to-earth action.



Esther
The book of Esther is named after it's leading character, a beautiful Jewish girl whom King Xerxes of Persia chose to be his queen. It records the great deliverance of the jewish people during the reign of Xerxes. Althogh the name of God does not appear in the book , God's care for his chosen people is clearly shown. Be assured that he is at work in your life today as well.



Job
The book of Job is named for its main character, a righteous man who is very rich. Even after losing everythng he owns and suffering from terriable sickness, Job still professes his trust in God. This book provides a profound statement on God's justice in light of human suffering. As you read this book, remember that even though you do not have all the answers to questions about suffering, God is still in control.



Psalms
Psalms gives voice to human emotion. This is not a book of catechism or doctrine; it is, for the most part, a book of prayer and praise. It speaks to God in prayer and of God in praise and professions of faith and trust. Think of the psalms as entries in a dairy, reflectig peoples' most intimate dealings with God. You will find comfort and stregnth here when you identify with the Old Testament saints who wrote these prayers and songs.





Proverbs
According to the prologue (( 1: 1-7 )), Proverbs was written to give "prudence to the simple, knowledge and discretion to the young" (( 1:4 )) and to make the wise wiser (( 1:5 )).Acquiring wisdom and knowing how to avoid the pitfalls of folly will lead to health and sucess. Although Proverbs is a practical book dealing with the art of the living, it bases wisdom solidly on the fear of the Lord (( 1:7 )). Here you will find wisdom that works and insights that will not wear out.



Ecclesiastes
Ecclesiastes teaches that a life not centered on God is purposeless and meaningless. Without God, nothing can satisfy { 2:25 }. With Him, all of life and his good gifts are to be gratefully received and fully used and enjoyed { 2:26... 11:8 } As you read this book, you will confront honest confessions of doubts and struggles with disillusionment. Think about your own sence of purpose as you seek to cultivate a God-fearing attitude toward life.








Song Of Songs
In ancient Israel everything human came to expression in words. In Song of Songs, love finds words-inspired words that disclose love's esquisite charm and beauty as one of God's choice gifts. This book illuminates the spontaneous and exclusive love between a lover an his beloved, demonstrating at the same time the kind of love Christ has for his church. Rejoice in the gift of love as you read this timeless expression of the joy and intimacy of love, the gift of our Creator.



Isaiah
Isaiah writes about the stormy period marking the expansion of the Assyrian empire and the decline of Israel. Isaiah unveils the full dimensions of God's judgment, warning Judah that her sin would bring captivity at the hands of Babylon. Yet, following round after round of warnings, Isaiah turns to the promise of God's comfort. forgiveness and restoration. The restored earth and the restored people will then conform to the divine ideal, and all will result in the praise and glory of the holy God of Israel.





Jeremiah
Jeremiah prophesies in Judah during a period when the doom of the entire nations-including Judah itself is being sealed. Judgment is one of the pervasive themes in Jeremiah's writings, although, like Isaiah, he writes, stirring words of hope about Judah's future redemption. Watch for Jeremiah's encouragement-propecies that are beng fulfilled today whenever sinful hearts are transformed by God.



Lamentations
Lamentatons is the only book in the Old Testament that consist solely of laments. It's author, traditionally thought to be Jeremeiah, laments the intense suffering of God's people and the utter devastation of the temple. Knowing that God is merciful, the author appeals for mercy in prayer. In the middle of the book. Jeremiah affirms God's goodness and faithfulness in the midst of suffering. Here you find a faith rooted in God's unchanging character- a ringing affirmation of the God whose "compassions never fail" [ 3:22 ]



Ezekiel
Ezekiel is amoung the more than 3000 Jews exiled to Babylon by Nebuchadnezzar in 597 B.C. There amoung the exiles he recieves hs call to become a prophet. As a priest-prophet called to minister the exiles, he uses words, visions, and "mini-dramas" to urge the people to renew their commitment to God. Nowhere in the Bible is God's control over all creation expressed more clearly that in Ezkiel. Watch for the message of God's majesty and glory, all this will happen so that "they will show that I am Lord" (6:10)



Daniel
Daniel records events that take place during Isreal's captivity and encourages the people to trust in the God who controls all of history.Daniel's visions always show God as triumphant. As you read this book, be encouraged that God still shows his faithfulness and protection today as he keeps his promise never to desert you. He gives you the strenght to stand firm in him as you serve and obey him day to day.



Hosea
This book is named after the prophet whose message it preserves. Hosea prophesies just before the northern kingdom of Israel is conquered by the Assyrians. The story of Hosea's family life illustrates a love story- that God loves us, even when our sins have broken his heart. Look beyond Hosea's suffering to see a startlng example of another's love that will not quit.Take courage in knowing that God's love and healing are avalable to you today.



Joel
The prophet Joel urges the people of Judah to turn again to God and warns them that judgement is at hand. As you read the book of Joel, you will see God' intense desire for itimacy with all his people. God cares for you with a passion and concern, and he desires to fill you with his Spirit and to recieve you in his Love.



Amos
Amos a shepherd from the small town of Tekoa, is sent to announce God's judgement on the northern kingdom of Israel. ith strong poetic imagery, Amos speaks passionately about God's concern for the poor and urges a return to righteousness and justice. As you read, look for God's perpective on issues of social justice and be prepared to respond with a heart of compassion.



Obadiah
Obadiah's prophecy centers around an ancient feud between Edom and Israel. As decendants of Esau, the Edomites hold a grudge against Israel because Jacob has cheatd their ancestor out of his birthright. Obadiah prophesies judgement against Edom that God is in control of the world. Edom itself will be destroyed, but Mount Zion and Israel will be delivered, and God's kingdom will triumph.



Jonah
When God sends him to warn the people of Nineveh to repent,Joanah runs in the opposite direction. But God uses the reluctant prophet as a vehicle of his grace. As you read this book , note God's great compassion for all people and his desire for sincere repentance regardless of what someone has done. Thank him for reaching out to you in love and calling you to tell others about his grace, for them.



Micah
The prophet Micah writes to the people of Judah to warn them that God's judgement is near because they have rejected God and his law. His message alternates between oracles of doom and oracles of hope, stressing that God hates idolatry, injustice, rebellion and empty ritualism, but he delights in forgiving those who return to him. As you read this book take comfort that God offers hope for those who remain faithful to him.



Nahum
Nahum ( meaning comfort) prophesies against the cruel nation of Assyria.He reminds the people of Judah that God is in control of history and will not allow evil to prevail forever. Nahum prophesies that the Assyrian city of Nineveh will fall, which does happen in 612 B.C. Kingdoms built on wickedness and tyranny must fall, as Assyria did.



Habakkuk
Habakkuk prayed and prophesied in a time whe the people of God were caught up in a crisis of religious and moral bewilderment. It is into the troubled scene that Habakkuk steps with his expressions of confusion and complaint. As you read this book, notice God's unexpected answer and hope that Habakkuk finally discovers.



Zephaniah
Zephaniah writes to the people of Judah, warning them of judgement and a terrible " day of the Lord" (1:7) that is to come - a day when God will severly punish the nations. As you read this book, look for the note of hope that God's judgement will pave the way for a new society in which justice prevails and all people worship the Lord.



Haggai
Haggai, along with the prophet Zechariah, encourages the returned exiles to rebuild the temple. The messages of Haggai are given during a four month peroid in 520 B.C. Haggai clearly shows the consequences of disobedience and the blessings of obedience as he tells the people they have deprived themselves of God's blessings by forsaking the temple building project. When the people give priority to God and his house, they are blessed. Obedience brings, the encouragement and strenght of God's Spirit.



Zechariah
Zechariah's prophetic ministry takes place after the exile,when the Jews return to their homeland from Babylonian captivity. His prophecies begin 2 months after Haggai's first message. To a people discouraged about their task of rebuilding the temple, Zechariah speaks words of encouragement and motivation.



Malachi
The temple has been rebuilt but times of prosperity have not come. God's people are suffering drought and famine, and they respond with indifference and spiritual lethargy. They have forgotten God and treat him with dishonor. Malachi ( meaning "my messenger") message is filled with indictments and warnings, be alert to God's passionate love for his people and his desire that they return that love with their whole heart and with obedience.








End of the
OLD TESTAMENT


(coming soon page 2, the other 27 books in The NEW testament )












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